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“To not let the fear in the hearts of others stop you from being who you were destined to be. We must never dim our light so that others may shine”

My review of Ryan Cahill’s “Of Blood and Fire” has been simmering, waiting for words that haven’t already been spoken. Yes, it’s a classic fantasy at its heart, but Cahill breathes fresh fire into the genre, bridging the gap between the classic and the modern. Don’t be intimidated by the page count – it’s pacing will have you devouring it, page after page, craving more with each turn. You’ll be at the end before you know it, wondering where we go from here.

On the cusp of manhood, Calen and his two best friends, Dann and Rist, embark on a rite of passage known as The Proving. Driven by the age-old desires of male bravado and a dash of youthful flirtation, they’re set to outdo each other and, perhaps, capture the hearts of the local ladies.

Fate, however, deals their confidence a harsh blow. The Proving, far from being a smooth transition, throws them into a series of events that will force them to grow up fast. The ripples of its chaos will forever alter not only their own destinies but also the lives of those they hold dear.

The narrative isn’t just confined to just the boy’s perspective. We get glimpses into the world through several other eyes, Calen’s sister Ella and his beloved wolfpine companion, Faenir. The usual fantasy suspects make an appearance, from mighty dwarves and towering giants to graceful elves and, yes, even fire-breathing dragons (as the cover undoubtedly hinted!). But the world holds a deeper magic, a system called the Spark. While some are blessed with the natural ability to wield it, not everyone recognizes its true potential, creating fascinating tensions and conflicts throughout the story.

While I usually gravitate towards stories driven by compelling characters, Cahill surprised me with a world as captivating as the individuals residing in it. The first half might be considered a slow burn by some, but I found it crucial in laying the groundwork for the explosive second half. 

“To Calen, a sword was a sword. Even sparring with Gaeleron, he saw little difference. But watching Ellisar, he understood. There was an elegance to the way he moved. If death could be beautiful, this was as close as it could come.”

Once the story reaches its tipping point, the action explodes with breathtaking momentum. Cahill crafts scenes that send your pulse racing and leave you clinging to the edge of your seat. Each page turn becomes a desperate plea for “just one more,” and even as your eyes beg for rest, your mind screams to push on, driven by the insatiable need to witness the next heart-stopping twist.

The beauty and brutality of Cahill’s writing lies in the precarious tightrope walk he creates. No character is guaranteed a sunrise, raising the stakes every page and fueling both my excitement and apprehension for the series’ journey ahead.

Ultimately, this book is ideal for classic fantasy fans who relish stories featuring both the “chosen one” trope and thrilling dragon riders.

 

Of Blood and Fire (The Bound and the Broken)

Of Blood and Fire (The Bound and the Broken)

Of Blood and Fire (The Bound and the Broken)

Of Blood and Fire (The Bound and the Broken)

Of Blood and Fire (The Bound and the Broken)

Of Blood and Fire (The Bound and the Broken)

Of Blood and Fire (The Bound and the Broken)

Of Blood and Fire (The Bound and the Broken)

Boe Kelley

By day, Boe is a seasoned Platforms Engineer, wielding his technical prowess and problem-solving acumen to tackle complex challenges. After the sun sets, he transforms into an avid reader, perpetually embarking on literary journeys to far-flung corners of the imagination. When he's not traversing fictional realms, Boe channels his creativity and pushes his physical and mental limits through his passions for cars, music, and martial arts. Boe's infectious positivity and cheerful demeanor infuse everything he does, making him a beacon of enthusiasm and expertise. His unwavering support for Indie Authors has earned him a well-deserved reputation as a champion of the literary underdog.

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